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Battery Relocation Guide


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Howdy doody all, Had a request to type up a few tips on a battery relocation... got a little carried away lol. Anyways thought I'd post it up, but be warned consider this a beta copy, I need more input from knowledgable members on legalities, tips on where I did something the hard (or stupid lol) way, etc. Get all the sheet together then put up a final post with the corrections in. Read, enjoy, and comment.

 

 

First off reasons for doing this mod. S13's are born front heavy, so the more weight to the back the better. In order to fit in a smaller battery up front chances are its gonna be an expensive battery to buy, and the race spec battery I keep around is great for low weight... but start running a stereo and starting up on a cold morning and they start becoming a little aggravating.

 

Now there are two ways to do it, first way, cruise up to battery world and buy a kit, all pretty self explanatory. Then theres the "Lordy" way lol. A.K.A. Cheap bastard. My theory is spend the money on parts not names.

 

First thing you'll need is the wire. Nissan chose 4 guage wire to run to the battery terminals in the standard cars, who am I to disagree. So head on down to Jaycar, or dick smiths if you wanna pay twice the price, and grab some 4 guage, (catalouge no. WH3064, $5.95 a metre.) Since its a self help wire cutting area a generous 5 metres (code for about 5.5 lol) will do the job, I originally bought 4 (4.5 ) And whilst it worked... it was tighter than I found acceptable, so another meter was spliced in. So two lengths of 5m ($59.50 total)

 

Right next up comes the couplings, your not going to need any terminal clamps so theres a saving right there, just reuse the set from up front. However couplers will be needed to connect the exiting battery wires to the new pair. So a pair of cable joiners are needed, basically a brass tube with a threaded nut at each end, the ends of the wire are inserted each end and ya tighten it up. (Jaycar catalouge HC4065, $5.95 each. Total cost now: $72)

 

While your their pick up some cable ties, handiest things in the world and at a decent price, $6.75 for a packet of 100, more than enough to hold the car together thru a couple of drift meets and tidy up those loose wires under the dash. Also a roll or two of electrical tape will fit the bill if you dont have any at home.

 

And thats it from jaycar, go have a look at the latest kits... mmmm, cheap ebc... Then make some puppy dog eyes when you make your purchases and see if you can score a free catalouge to sit and have a read thru when bored.

 

Now its time to find something to secure the battery with, the ideal battery box keeps the battery secure, is resistant to acid should it leak and stops anything from accidentally shorting the contacts on top of the box.

 

So I trooped off to bunnings for a wander... and there it sat in the buckets/storage section. A storage container with a locking lid just bigger than the battery, beautiful. and only $8. (total cost, $80).

 

And breath easy, thats the last of the expense!

 

Now we have everything we need. Pull out the old battery, and remove the old battery terminals from the leads. Put the couplers onto the ends of the old leads, then connect them to the new wire. These terminals come with rubber covers in the package, however I dont really trust these to stay put and prevent shorts, so ample amounts of electrical tape was wrapped around each coupler to make sure no shorts are on the horizon.

 

Heres a suggestion from S14Kev on another way to connect up the leads, the battery cutoff switch is a great idea for when your under the hood tinkering ;)

 

Keeping the original terminals in the engine bay looks best. It's usually best to bolt a false terminal to a block of urethane or wood and use that as your connection rather than splicing two cables together. Looks neater and means you don't have to run to the boot to disconnect your battery. A battery cut of switch looks even neater. For full cred cut a neat a hole in your front guard and route the cut off switch through that

 

Now the wire needs to be run into the boot. Be mindfull that the wire should not "rub" as shorting the power will spoil a spirited drive thru the country. How to run the lead is really a matter of personal choice, u can put it through the cabin if ya want, personally I ran it underneath alongside the chasis rails, hell if its safe enough to run the fuel lines and brake lines down there I'm gonna trust it with the battery cables. Cable tie it up, making sure that it cant flop around onto the road or into the driveshaft or exhaust or anything disasterous like that, and remember to go over the top of the rear suspension, taking care that it cant foul anything there. Have a look at the fuel lines running into the tank to get an idea on how to do it. Finally run the leads up into the boot... handily there is a grommet in the centre of the boot under the spare wheel, so I ran mine up through there. For extra insulation of the wire run it through some garden hose, this will help with keeping the wire safe month after month or rubbing and jostling down there. *Big thanks to S14kev for the shout out*

 

Beautiful, now you just need to get the battery in there and hook it up. I ran a test here just to make sure all was as it should be, so the battery terminals where put on the end of the wires and then hooked up to the battery, just to make sure she'd still turn over. She did, so looks like this mission will be a success.

 

Now how to secure the battery... hmm one of the trickier parts of the job, again its a matter of personal preferance. I took a length of an old belt I had lying around, but anything that can handle the weight of the battery pulling on it will do. Pulling off the covers in the corner of the boot I found some holes in the metal panels, so pushing a bolt with a washer through this hole and a corresponding hole in the belt I secured one end, then searching around the back of the boot I found another suitable hole and repeated the process making sure the setup was tight enough to ensure the battery box couldnt move. MAke sure to use the washers to try and prevent the belt from tearing, or if you have the parts about bend up a metal frame to secure the box, like I said, this is an area thats is really DIY with what you have available to ya.

 

I've just been informed that the belt may not be legal, and a metal bracket may be needed (Big cheers again to S14Kev). Kay this means another trip to bunnings, head over to the metal department, for me this is out the back where the big bits of wood and roofing stuff are kept. Dig around untill you find a peice of what I believe is called flat bar. basically a long strip of metal. Purchase (I think 2 metres cost me $16? been a long time, been used on intercooler mounts and all kindsa crap and still got a meter left) Then take it to the lordy school of panel beating, ie a brick and a hammer, put it over the edge of the brick where u want it bent and wallop. once u have the shape u want, bring out the drill, drill holes, and bolt assembly together.

 

A few bolts through the side of the battery box and the harness tightened up will make sure the box wont jump out of its harness.

 

Now to seat the battery into the box. I took the original clamp that would tighten over the battery to secure it. Drilling two holes in the side of the battery box the hooks of the battery clamp where inserted, then the top of the clamp was tightened down and presto, a secured battery.

 

Next comes running the leads to the terminals. I drilled a few holes in the lid of the battery box to run them through and then hooked them up. Ventilation of the battery is important, so more holes the merrier, the purpose of the lid is purely to stop anything shorting the terminals, so it a lidded box cannot be found, some covered terminals will suffice.

 

So put on the lid, make sure everything is tight and secure, then see if she'll turn over, and presto, one battery relocation!

Edited by Lord_DJ
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Cable insulation is thin. I'd never feel confident having unprotected cable running under the car - especially next to fuel lines. All it takes is a couple of months of rubbing before it sparks. No need to mention the consequences in an accident. It's safest to run your cable through rubber hose under the car as added protection. Garden hose works well but looks pov.

 

Keeping the original terminals in the engine bay looks best. It's usually best to bolt a false terminal to a block of urethane or wood and use that as your connection rather than splicing two cables together. Looks neater and means you don't have to run to the boot to disconnect your battery. A battery cut of switch looks even neater. For full cred cut a neat a hole in your front guard and route the cut off switch through that :lol:

 

I believe batteries must be secured by a metal bracket to metalwork. I don't think a belt is legal. Generic battery brackets are usually the easiest way to secure a battery.

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the battery box actually technically needs to be completely sealed with ventilation only to the outside of the car. i had to go through this at the pits with mine coz i got a bastard inspector (east perth sux). i got away with a marine box with the holes plugged up and a tube running through the floor of the boot. its not really sealed but its close enough for them.

 

it needs to be sealed because the boot is considered part of the cabin apparently.

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Kay, the project evolves... so what size piping was needed for the ventilation are we talking garden hose or aircon tubing kinda size, I'm very big on battery ventilation after having one of the bastards explode on me, and it makes sense they want it plumbed to the outside of the boot. Shouldnt be too hard to add a peice of pipe with a silicon bead around it to the box.

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all mine has is a piece of rubber vacuum hose from the lid to the floor. completely non-functional but shuts them up. i dont know if youve seen a marine battery box but it has big gaps on either side of the lid for battery cables to run. mine still has those gaps but you cant see them from the top.

 

so to answer your question, i dont know. i just did as much as was required for them to pick on something else.

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Ok i only skimmed over this just looknig for any area i might be able to put my 2 bob's worth in with.

 

I suppose my suggestion for people going to the pits with mod's is my first preference and i don't care i i lived in Yanchep, would be to go to Welshpool...the head inspector there Reno is really good with people who are into modding their car and from discussions i've had with him in the past he actually disagree's with some of the opinion's cops have in respect to the RT(VS) Act etc...(hopefully he's still there and hasn't retired yet, but i fully recommend going to Welshpool pits if you need some thing approved...from what i hear from a few people is they are generally the more accepting and approving pit place.

 

Now back to topic...securing the battery in the boot. If i were you i'd look at setting up something like a lowrider set up (with respect to batteries in the boot). Basically i think one of the safest ways to go would be to make up a bracket using angle iron the size of the battery base (or if you can remove the metal bracket base from the engine bay and relocate it, even better...) but then you are best to try secure it to a section of the boot that makes contact with the frame, subframe (whatever you want to call it...for the oldies and i know new cars don't technically have em, i'm talking about the chassis) that way your battery is completely secured to the main structure of the car and if it's tightly secured in the bracket it ain't gonna go nowhere even if you have a bit of a prang or knock the car in a way that might jolt the battery loose..

 

Now Lowriders do that to prevent buckling etc from the forces created from hopping, 3 wheeling etc etc...but i'd say telling the pits it is secured to the frame of the car would be a positive...if your gonna go for a normal wet cell battery then i'd probably think like Dr00 said you'd need to enclose it, but have ventilation so air flows thorugh the box and any fumes or chemicals etc can disipate in the atmosphere...

 

If you take the marine dry cell approach (and i'm not too sure what the wight difference is between a wet cell and dry cell battery) then you probably wouldn't need to enclose it (but IMO i think enclosing it removes it from the eye and makes the boot look cleaner)...but with dry cell you don't need to worry about battery acid spillage etc as there is no fluid in the battery...

 

anyway thats just a brief overview of a option you could take if you wanted to do a good proper job...

 

Give me a PM if you wanna know more. I think i've read enough Lowrider magazines and researched enough about how to build em that i am confident in answering any question you have regarding battery location in a boot the way they are fitted in Lowryders :) ...

Edited by Carlos
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Cheers mate, I'm in full agreeance with the metal, was hoping to make a cheap alternative for DIYer's so thats why a lot of my parts recommendations are by using cheap parts one can find around the place. I've used some four tonne webbing a mate of mine procured for me on mine but looks like I'm gonna have to go for a frame... ahh just as well, will give me the motivation to get out a camera, and do it properly. Angle Iron definately sounds a good idea if I go for a completely encased frame, however cutting and bending it could be a bit of a bastard for your average home handy man, If you have any hints on how to get through it with the tools generally available to a modifier would be great, and I'm trying to avoid welding the entire assembly together as again it makes it a bit hard for your average DIYer.

 

Course that said I'm not entirely sure the tools the average home handyman has, I'm kind of working on what I keep around the house as an average, hammer, hacksaw, drill etc. But I've always been lucky enough to have a workshop to drive up to when i need to weld something or spin it thru a lathe. I'm kind of aiming for tools that can be bought for a few dollars, so riveted, bolted etc. so as everyone can perform the mod.

 

Ok sounds like for the hose your free to use as you please, which is grouse, will help save on total costs.

 

heh heh believe it or not this isnt the first battery relocation I've done, but earlier versions where externally mounted below the car to lower COG in a tarmac rally car... amazing the rules and regulations you come across for something as simple as this in a streeter lol.

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Cheers mate, I'm in full agreeance with the metal, was hoping to make a cheap alternative for DIYer's so thats why a lot of my parts recommendations are by using cheap parts one can find around the place. I've used some four tonne webbing a mate of mine procured for me on mine but looks like I'm gonna have to go for a frame... ahh just as well, will give me the motivation to get out a camera, and do it properly. Angle Iron definately sounds a good idea if I go for a completely encased frame, however cutting and bending it could be a bit of a bastard for your average home handy man, If you have any hints on how to get through it with the tools generally available to a modifier would be great, and I'm trying to avoid welding the entire assembly together as again it makes it a bit hard for your average DIYer.

 

Course that said I'm not entirely sure the tools the average home handyman has, I'm kind of working on what I keep around the house as an average, hammer, hacksaw, drill etc. But I've always been lucky enough to have a workshop to drive up to when i need to weld something or spin it thru a lathe. I'm kind of aiming for tools that can be bought for a few dollars, so riveted, bolted etc. so as everyone can perform the mod.

 

Ok sounds like for the hose your free to use as you please, which is grouse, will help save on total costs.

 

heh heh believe it or not this isnt the first battery relocation I've done, but earlier versions where externally mounted below the car to lower COG in a tarmac rally car... amazing the rules and regulations you come across for something as simple as this in a streeter lol.

Yeah my angle of thought is if you use cheap parts you sometimes sacrifice quality and given this is some thing that needs to be approved you want to do the job as well as you can to save messing about redoing things if it's not approved.

 

But i get what you mean, gotta try stick to relatively cheap products/materials so everyone can take advantage of it. I'm not too sure how much lengths of angle iron go for, i've got mates in the steel industry so i know i can probably get a discount if i was chasing some. But also you could always look at metal scrap yards etc where prices are cheaper.

 

With the tools aspect, i figure everyone must know someone who has access to or owns the tools needed for the job (6 degree's of separation :) ). Main thing is welder and angle grinder (with a cutting blade) apart from the little tools you need for connecting electrical wires and securing them in place (which cable ties etc are good enough for), spanners etc etc. But with the battery mount you need to put some quality in to it so the pits will pass it, so metal frame is a must with metal clamp to hold it in place. The rest of the enclosed box could be made of whatever you want really as long as it doesn't look dodgey to a pit inspector (so plywood, plastic or perspex, metal, aluminium etc etc) just thinking then about the aluminium side of things you could always hunt through a scrap yard for an enclosed alloy box with the vents already cut into the metal (eg old metal home air conditioner box...pretty sure some of them that mount in the window had metal enclosures with vents in the sides for ventilation)...saves you from pissing about venting the metal yourself... :) but then you could just rivet the pieces used for the enclosure to the angle iron base. Just make sure you have a lid that can be secured properly and that should be ok i would think :unsure:

 

But i would think everyone on this forum would either have the necessary tools already or know someone who has them, so they wouldn't need to use a shop to do the job and pay them for it....surely most people on here would be willing to help a fellow member out :)

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Howdy doody all, Had a request to type up a few tips on a battery relocation... got a little carried away lol. Anyways thought I'd post it up, but be warned consider this a beta copy, I need more input from knowledgable members on legalities, tips on where I did something the hard (or stupid lol) way, etc. Get all the sheet together then put up a final post with the corrections in. Read, enjoy, and comment.

 

 

First off reasons for doing this mod. S13's are born front heavy, so the more weight to the back the better. In order to fit in a smaller battery up front chances are its gonna be an expensive battery to buy, and the race spec battery I keep around is great for low weight... but start running a stereo and starting up on a cold morning and they start becoming a little aggravating.

 

Now there are two ways to do it, first way, cruise up to battery world and buy a kit, all pretty self explanatory. Then theres the "Lordy" way lol. A.K.A. Cheap bastard. My theory is spend the money on parts not names.

 

First thing you'll need is the wire. Nissan chose 4 guage wire to run to the battery terminals in the standard cars, who am I to disagree. So head on down to Jaycar, or dick smiths if you wanna pay twice the price, and grab some 4 guage, (catalouge no. WH3064, $5.95 a metre.) Since its a self help wire cutting area a generous 5 metres (code for about 5.5 lol) will do the job, I originally bought 4 (4.5 ) And whilst it worked... it was tighter than I found acceptable, so another meter was spliced in. So two lengths of 5m ($59.50 total)

 

Right next up comes the couplings, your not going to need any terminal clamps so theres a saving right there, just reuse the set from up front. However couplers will be needed to connect the exiting battery wires to the new pair. So a pair of cable joiners are needed, basically a brass tube with a threaded nut at each end, the ends of the wire are inserted each end and ya tighten it up. (Jaycar catalouge HC4065, $5.95 each. Total cost now: $72)

 

While your their pick up some cable ties, handiest things in the world and at a decent price, $6.75 for a packet of 100, more than enough to hold the car together thru a couple of drift meets and tidy up those loose wires under the dash. Also a roll or two of electrical tape will fit the bill if you dont have any at home.

 

And thats it from jaycar, go have a look at the latest kits... mmmm, cheap ebc... Then make some puppy dog eyes when you make your purchases and see if you can score a free catalouge to sit and have a read thru when bored.

 

Now its time to find something to secure the battery with, the ideal battery box keeps the battery secure, is resistant to acid should it leak and stops anything from accidentally shorting the contacts on top of the box.

 

So I trooped off to bunnings for a wander... and there it sat in the buckets/storage section. A storage container with a locking lid just bigger than the battery, beautiful. and only $8. (total cost, $80).

 

And breath easy, thats the last of the expense!

 

Now we have everything we need. Pull out the old battery, and remove the old battery terminals from the leads. Put the couplers onto the ends of the old leads, then connect them to the new wire. These terminals come with rubber covers in the package, however I dont really trust these to stay put and prevent shorts, so ample amounts of electrical tape was wrapped around each coupler to make sure no shorts are on the horizon.

 

Heres a suggestion from S14Kev on another way to connect up the leads, the battery cutoff switch is a great idea for when your under the hood tinkering ;)

 

Keeping the original terminals in the engine bay looks best. It's usually best to bolt a false terminal to a block of urethane or wood and use that as your connection rather than splicing two cables together. Looks neater and means you don't have to run to the boot to disconnect your battery. A battery cut of switch looks even neater. For full cred cut a neat a hole in your front guard and route the cut off switch through that

 

Now the wire needs to be run into the boot. Be mindfull that the wire should not "rub" as shorting the power will spoil a spirited drive thru the country. How to run the lead is really a matter of personal choice, u can put it through the cabin if ya want, personally I ran it underneath alongside the chasis rails, hell if its safe enough to run the fuel lines and brake lines down there I'm gonna trust it with the battery cables. Cable tie it up, making sure that it cant flop around onto the road or into the driveshaft or exhaust or anything disasterous like that, and remember to go over the top of the rear suspension, taking care that it cant foul anything there. Have a look at the fuel lines running into the tank to get an idea on how to do it. Finally run the leads up into the boot... handily there is a grommet in the centre of the boot under the spare wheel, so I ran mine up through there. For extra insulation of the wire run it through some garden hose, this will help with keeping the wire safe month after month or rubbing and jostling down there. *Big thanks to S14kev for the shout out*

 

Beautiful, now you just need to get the battery in there and hook it up. I ran a test here just to make sure all was as it should be, so the battery terminals where put on the end of the wires and then hooked up to the battery, just to make sure she'd still turn over. She did, so looks like this mission will be a success.

 

Now how to secure the battery... hmm one of the trickier parts of the job, again its a matter of personal preferance. I took a length of an old belt I had lying around, but anything that can handle the weight of the battery pulling on it will do. Pulling off the covers in the corner of the boot I found some holes in the metal panels, so pushing a bolt with a washer through this hole and a corresponding hole in the belt I secured one end, then searching around the back of the boot I found another suitable hole and repeated the process making sure the setup was tight enough to ensure the battery box couldnt move. MAke sure to use the washers to try and prevent the belt from tearing, or if you have the parts about bend up a metal frame to secure the box, like I said, this is an area thats is really DIY with what you have available to ya.

 

I've just been informed that the belt may not be legal, and a metal bracket may be needed (Big cheers again to S14Kev). Kay this means another trip to bunnings, head over to the metal department, for me this is out the back where the big bits of wood and roofing stuff are kept. Dig around untill you find a peice of what I believe is called flat bar. basically a long strip of metal. Purchase (I think 2 metres cost me $16? been a long time, been used on intercooler mounts and all kindsa crap and still got a meter left) Then take it to the lordy school of panel beating, ie a brick and a hammer, put it over the edge of the brick where u want it bent and wallop. once u have the shape u want, bring out the drill, drill holes, and bolt assembly together.

 

A few bolts through the side of the battery box and the harness tightened up will make sure the box wont jump out of its harness.

 

Now to seat the battery into the box. I took the original clamp that would tighten over the battery to secure it. Drilling two holes in the side of the battery box the hooks of the battery clamp where inserted, then the top of the clamp was tightened down and presto, a secured battery.

 

Next comes running the leads to the terminals. I drilled a few holes in the lid of the battery box to run them through and then hooked them up. Ventilation of the battery is important, so more holes the merrier, the purpose of the lid is purely to stop anything shorting the terminals, so it a lidded box cannot be found, some covered terminals will suffice.

 

So put on the lid, make sure everything is tight and secure, then see if she'll turn over, and presto, one battery relocation!

Ok How much you charge to do it for me?

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Ahh, well havent found out the completely legal way for doing it yet, I'm gonna leave it to simmer here for a few weeks untill the kinks are worked out. Then I'll build the eventual group's decision on the best way of doing it and take it into the pits to see what they think.

 

I'm really doing this for people who would like a bit of DIY in their back yard, I suppose once the design is finalised I could knock out a few more if people would like to pick them up.... or I could do them in carbon fibre should that be the way people go... but its too early for me to be offering installs sorry dude. I hate passing up cash or beer lol, but the wait time could be horrendous. If you want it done quick chase up battery world or similar, they should be able to find a decent kit for it, or a workshop should be able to help ya out.

 

But damn now u got me thinking lol... hmm carbon fibre battery boxes... I think i've found me a market...

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Just a word of advice i suppose, draw up your intentions on paper, clearly explain it in writing, collect corroborating evidence and then speak to the pits about what you plan to do....just saves you lots of time and money in the long run.

 

When i was enquiring about hyraulics years ago, i was told best thing to do is draw up what i intend to do, how i intend to do it and substantiate it all with any evidence you can find to say it will work and not cause a problem in some way and then the pit dudes will look over it and say weather or not it's worthwhile gonig ahead with it. They won't approve it but they should tell you if they would or would not be likely to approve it once they see the final product or modifiction...

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Carlos is correct, i forgot to mention that a sealed dry cell battery doesnt need to be enclosed at all. if you spend the money on an odyssey or something then you get a better longer lasting battery and you just need to bolt it down :D

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Ahh, well I'm not the biggest oddesey fan, I've got one, and I use it for sporting applications, but I wont buy another one, what I got for the money, wasnt worth it to be brutally honest. Doesnt have the capacity I need for a street car and to get the capacity i need I'm looking at around double to triple the price and not that much weight savings... dont get me wrong, they are a good product, but they are far too overpriced.

 

Anywhoo this is just a quick note, I recently ran across an advert for proper car battery box's in supercheap, $14.99 for a small, $15.99 for a large, buying one of these would probably make life alot easier for the install. Running late for work, so thats it.

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No no, I didnt mean to say they where crap. From the literature I was given when I was buying mine they apparantley are a superior product to the wet cell alternative. Its just in comparison the costs are a lot higher in order to do the same job. The race one I have is a tiny thing, imagine motorbike battery size, and its enough to turn over a car but it doesnt like it, and the big buggers that are suitable for a street car, last time i looked (two to three years ago now, so they could be a lot cheaper...) where going for 4 to 500 dollars for a car sized application.

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  • 4 months later...

throwing in my two bobs worth... the 'nice' men in blue have given me two yellow stickers to date (both were dismissed as bogus).... I highly recomend the welshpool pits too. they seem to know what they are doiong and you can talk to them.

as note.... first sticker was beacuse they thought i was too low, made it over the pit guide thing..... the second sticker was because the police thought my springs were to hard?!?! again they were proven wrong. would like my money back (and lost time) for going over without real reason... anyhow..... :jump:

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  • 2 months later...

I am thinking of doing this but don't know if i am going a bit over board. Here is what i am thinking

 

Large Optima Red Top in boot

 

Run a 2g cable straight to the starter motor

 

Run a 2g cable to a Gold Fuse Box (Jaycar CAT. NO. SZ2074) and then;

1 X 4g to the '+' at the front (Prob connect via a breaker switch)

1 x 4g to the subwoofer amp

1 x 4g to the Bosch fuel

1 x 4g spare atm

 

Run a 2g cable straight to the chassis as a ground

 

Shopping List

Jarcar Cat# SZ2074 x 1 $45

Jarcar Cat# HC4066 x 3 $21

Jarcar Cat# HC4040 x 2 $23

Jarcar Cat# SF2265 X 1 $23

Jarcar Cat# WH3070 x 4m $52

Jarcar Cat# WH3066 x 5.5m $33

Large Optima Battery ~$300

Cable ties etc $10

Homemade angle iron bracket $nil

 

Total Cost ~ $500

 

Probably going a bit overboard but prefer to do it properly the first time and then forget about it.

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  • 8 months later...

price update on 4 guage wire and brass cable joiners from jaycar

 

 

wire = $8.40 a metre = total of 10m = $84

cable joiner = $6.95 each

 

im in the process of doing it and after reading more i going to put it through a garden hose to b on the safe side.

 

good info guys, keep it up

Edited by angel
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  • 5 months later...

this might sound stupid but if you have a completely sealed, un-spill able battery, eg like an optima battery

can it vent inside or does it not even need a vent (will stagnant air be ok for it?)

Edited by Eagz
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